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CASE REPORT
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 338-343

Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy as the Initial Manifestation of Sarcoidosis


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France

Correspondence Address:
Bahram Bodaghi
Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Paris VI. Department of Ophthalmology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 75013, Paris
France
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Purpose: To report an undiagnosed case of systemic sarcoidosis manifesting with bilateral acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE). Case Report: A 26-year-old Caucasian man was referred for management of unilateral visual loss together with a paracentral scotoma developing 2 weeks after a flu-like syndrome. Clinical signs and ancillary diagnostic investigations suggested APMPPE. Laboratory tests demonstrated elevated serum angiotensin converting enzyme and lysozyme levels. Chest CT-scan disclosed moderate hilar lymph node calcifications but QuantiFERON-TB gold test was negative and bronchoalveolar lavage and biopsies were unremarkable. Accessory salivary gland biopsy disclosed epithelioid and gigantocellular granuloma formation without caseum, confirming a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The fellow eye was involved a few days later and the patient complained of dyspnea. Echocardiography disclosed severe granulomatous myocardial infiltration and high dose corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide were initiated. Systemic treatment controlled both cardiac and ocular lesions, and was tapered accordingly. Conclusion: The constellation of "white dot syndromes" and systemic symptoms necessitates a general work-up to exclude granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis or tuberculosis. Delayed diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis may have life-threatening consequences and the ophthalmologist may be the first physician to diagnose the condition.


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