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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 219-223

Lacrimal gland changes on orbital imaging after glaucoma drainage implant surgery


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Eye Institute at Harborview, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington; Department of Ophthalmology, Callahan Eye Hospital, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Eye Institute at Harborview, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
3 Department of Ophthalmology, Eye Institute at Harborview, University of Washington Medical Center; Department of Ophthalmology, Seattle Face and Skin, Seattle, Washington, USA

Correspondence Address:
Sarah M Jacobs
Callahan Eye Hospital, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jovr.jovr_200_17

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Purpose: This study evaluates the radiographic appearance of lacrimal gland tissue after placement of a glaucoma drainage implant (GDI) to characterize the impact of the device on the gland's imaging patterns. Methods: We performed retrospective chart review of departmental records at two urban academic medical centers, which were systematically searched using procedure codes to identify adult glaucoma patients who underwent unilateral superotemporal GDI from January 1995 to December 2015. Radiology records were cross-checked to identify the subset of patients who underwent postoperative orbital CT or MRI. Chart review collected data on glaucoma diagnosis, management, examination findings, and clinical complaints. Imaging studies were reviewed for orbital changes using qualitative assessment of the radiographic appearances and computer-guided calculations to quantify asymmetries. Results: A review of all eye operations in the inclusion period identified 315 patients with GDI, 13 of whom were eligible for inclusion. Elapsed time from device placement to imaging averaged 41.9 months, and the average clinical follow-up was 56.4 months. Radiographic lacrimal gland changes were appreciable in 69% (9 of 13) of patients, most commonly with posterior displacement and flattening of the gland (7 of 13). ImageJ analysis revealed significantly smaller lacrimal glands in orbits with GDI (P = 0.04). No clear correlation was found between gland changes and clinical dry eye symptoms. Conclusion: GDI placement was associated with radiographically-appreciable lacrimal gland changes in two-thirds of patients, with changes occurring in a predictable pattern of lacrimal gland flattening, posteriorization, and volume loss. Radiographic changes correlated with clinical symptoms in few patients.


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