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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 144-150

Modified deep sclerectomy for the surgical treatment of glaucoma


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz; Ophthalmic Research Center, Labbafinejad Medical Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Ophthalmic Research Center, Labbafinejad Medical Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Department of Ophthalmology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
4 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
5 Glaucoma Division, Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, California, United States, United States

Correspondence Address:
Farideh Sharifipour
Ophthalmic Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, No. 23, Paidarfard St., Boostan 9 St., Pasdaran Ave., Tehran 16666
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jovr.jovr_228_17

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Purpose: To report the short-term outcomes of modified deep sclerectomy (MDS) in the management of open angle glaucoma. Methods: This prospective, non-randomized, controlled study included 105 eyes (105 patients) with open angle glaucoma. Eyes were categorized as follows: trabeculectomy (30 eyes), MDS (27 eyes), phacotrabeculectomy (28 eyes), and phaco-MDS (20 eyes). The MDS technique involved removal of a third scleral flap to expose the suprachoroidal space and excision of a trabecular block. A two-site approach was used for combined surgeries. Main outcome measures included intraocular pressure (IOP), number of glaucoma medications, and complications. Treatment success was defined as an IOP of 6–15 mmHg and/or a 30% reduction in IOP. Results: All groups showed significant decrease in IOP and number of medications (both P s < 0.001). The MDS group had a higher IOP (13.9 ± 3.8 vs. 12.4 ± 2.5 mmHg, P = 0.080) and required more medications (P = 0.001) than the trabeculectomy group at 1 year. The MDS group had a higher baseline IOP than the trabeculectomy group (P = 0.004) and both the groups showed similar IOP reductions (33.3% vs. 25.7%, P = 0.391). The phaco-MDS and phacotrabeculectomy groups had comparable IOP (13.3 ± 3.1 vs. 12.4 ± 3.1 mmHg, P = 0.354), number of medications (P = 0.594), and IOP reduction (P = 0.509) at 1-year follow-up visit. The trabeculectomy and phacotrabeculectomy groups developed more wound leaks (P = 0.043) and required more bleb needling during the early postoperative period (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The MDS technique seems to be slightly inferior to trabeculectomy, but when combined with phacoemulsification, is safer and results in similar IOP outcomes.


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